Be Careful When Joking with Staff

Everybody appreciates a good laugh, and nowhere is this truer than in a hospital. The dynamics of a hospital environment are very fluid. People's nerves get frazzled by unreasonable requests, deadlines, scheduling conflicts, and other issues. This stress can build walls between supervisors and their staff. Studies show humor is a great way for managers to connect with their employees and keep them motivated and engaged.

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Johns Hopkins to Share Surgical Care Methods

There may be procedural changes coming to your operating rooms this year. The Johns Hopkins Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality will partner with 750 hospitals across the country to improve surgical care for patients. In collaboration with the American College of Surgeons, and funded by the U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), the program will disseminate a protocol, already in use at Johns Hopkins since 2013, that covers all aspects of pre- and post-operative patient care.

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Reducing Sepsis Mortality with Data

The development of large amounts of data in the healthcare industry is causing many hospitals and health institutions to begin leveraging this information. Just last month, one institution, showed exactly how to leverage clinical systems data by tackling the No. 1 most expensive hospital condition, sepsis. This potentially fatal, whole-body inflammation is caused by severe infection, but can be stifled if an intervention is done early and appropriately. Penn Medicine's algorithmic early warning system did just that.

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Three Reasons Robots Might Not Be Worth It

Since robotic surgery's inception with prostate cancer treatment, many other areas of surgery have been exploring its potential benefits in terms of patient outcomes. These robotic systems are believed to be helping extend the careers of older surgeons, and shorten the learning curve for younger ones. However, the mixed evidence on robotic surgery’s long-term effectiveness cannot be ignored.

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